Auchindrain Township | Stoner’s House (exterior – EMTPY)
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Stoner’s House (exterior – EMTPY)

Stoner’s House (exterior – EMTPY)

This is one of five longhouses in the township. It is named for “Duncan Stoner” Munro. He was originally a stonemason, and “Duncan Stoner” is a direct translation of the Gaelic Donnchadh Clachair, one of the two historical Gaelic nicknames that we know from Auchindrain.

[caption id="attachment_21695" align="alignnone" width="664"]Duncan “Stoner” Munro, centre; his son Malcolm Archibald “Cally Stoner” Munro, left, and an unknown visitor: outside Stoner’s House, early 1930s Duncan “Stoner” Munro, centre; his son Malcolm Archibald “Cally Stoner” Munro, left, and an unknown visitor: outside Stoner’s House, early 1930s[/caption]

This building dates back to the early 1800s, and when new would have been a single open space under the roof like Martin’s House, Eddie’s House and others. At some point, we do not know exactly when, it was modernised by having an internal wall built between the living space and the byre, and by having chimneys and proper fireplaces provided.

[caption id="attachment_21696" align="alignnone" width="414"]Bella Munro and Flora McIntyre (of McIntyres’ House), feeding the hens outside Stoner’s House, early 1930s Bella Munro and Flora McIntyre (of McIntyres’ House), feeding the hens outside Stoner’s House, early 1930s[/caption]

[caption id="attachment_21697" align="alignnone" width="368"]Malcolm Archibald “Cally Stoner” Munro outside the family home, early 1930s Malcolm Archibald “Cally Stoner” Munro outside the family home, early 1930s[/caption]

When the building was reconstructed again around 1907, the roof was replaced completely. They had learned how to do things differently since Martin’s House got its new roof in 1893. Here, the crucks were sawn off at the top of the walls (you can still see their stumps set into the stonework), and a new timber roof structure was made and covered in corrugated steel. This enabled the rooms to be given ceilings, and for a floored attic to be created for use as extra sleeping space – this was reached up a steep and narrow staircase inside the closet. Stoner’s House is the only building in the township with a proper upper floor. At the same time, what had been a single door used by both people and animals was converted into the window to the left of the house door, and two new doorways to the house and the byre gave the house the form it has now.

[caption id="attachment_21698" align="alignnone" width="1024"]Bella Munro at the house door, early 1930s Bella Munro at the house door, early 1930s[/caption]



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