Auchindrain Township | McIntyres’ House
21594
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McIntyres’ House

McIntyres’ House

 You are standing outside McIntyres’ House.  It is named for brother and sister Ian and Flora McIntyre, who lived here from the early 1930s until 1961: until he died in 1954, they shared the house with their uncle Neil McPhail. 

 The 1789 plan shows a building on this site,but the existing structure dates from the 1870s. The photograph shows the house in the late 19th or early 20th century. The porch door opens to a different side, and the porch is clad with corrugated steel sheets rather than timber.  There is also a window, now blocked, high in the north gable.

It isn’t clear who the people in the photograph are. It is possible that the two boys are John and Neil McCallum (if so the photograph must have been taken around 1902-1904). If this is the case, the girl could be Catherine, Neil McGugan’s grand-daughter.

[caption id="attachment_21599" align="alignnone" width="695"]Taken by “Young Eddie” MacCallum in the mid 1950s, Eddie MacCallum is outside McIntyre’s House feeding his horse Polly: Polly’s foal, Rona, is seen at foot. Behind the horses can be seen a lean-to store clad with corrugated steel sheets, set against the building’s north gable. This is not present in the late 19th or early 20th century photograph of the building seen above, and “Young Eddie” MacCallum remembers it as a store for coal and other things. Just to the left of the photograph was a spring that provided the water supply for the house: this now rises underneath the modern Visitor Centre. Taken by “Young Eddie” MacCallum in the mid 1950s, Eddie MacCallum is outside McIntyre’s House feeding his horse Polly: Polly’s foal, Rona, is seen at foot. Behind the horses can be seen a lean-to store clad with corrugated steel sheets, set against the building’s north gable. This is not present in the late 19th or early 20th century photograph of the building seen above, and “Young Eddie” MacCallum remembers it as a store for coal and other things. Just to the left of the photograph was a spring that provided the water supply for the house: this now rises underneath the modern Visitor Centre.[/caption]

This photograph, taken by Young Eddie MacCallum in the mid-1950s, shows his father feeding his horse Polly: Polly’s foal, Rona, is nearby.  Behind the horses there is a lean-to store clad with corrugated steel sheets, set against the building’s north gable.  This is not there in the older photograph. Young Eddie remembers it as a store for coal and other things.  Just to the left of house was a spring that provided a water supply: this now rises underneath the modern Visitor Centre.

To read more about the people who lived in this building, click here.

To read more about this building, click here

 

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